Call for application: DEEPICE Summer school on modelling and statistics – September 2022, 19-23, Bremerhaven (Germany)

Call for application: DEEPICE Summer school on modelling and statistics – September 2022, 19-23, Bremerhaven (Germany)

22 June 2022

In the framework of the DEEPICE project, a summer school on modelling and statistics sciences will be organized in Bremerhaven, Germany in September 2022 (19-23th).

The DEEPICE Summer school will focus on statistical and modelling tools for the interpretation of ice-cores (2 ECTS) with theoretical courses and exercises. It is aimed at PhD students who are involved in ice core climate record interpretation.

The school will include courses on:            

  • Time-series analysis in the time and spectral domain
  • Climate dynamics on glacial-interglacial time scales
  • Introduction into Earth System models 
  • Introduction to carbon cycle modelling
  • Introduction into ice dynamics

5 places are available for external students. Applications are now open until the 22nd of July 2022.

In order to apply, please visit the dedicated page.

DEEPICE PhD students at EGU2022

DEEPICE PhD students at EGU2022

Several DEEPICE PhD students will present their research work at the next EGU General Assembly in May 2022 (in Vienna and online). See details below.

AS3.1 – Aerosol Chemistry and Physics (General Session), room F1 on Tuesday, 24 May 2022, 11:32 CEST:

EGU22-8494
Chemical Analysis of Organic Aerosol Particles and Nanoplastics Deposited on Alpine Glaciers
by Hanne Notø et al.

CR2.7 – From climate to ice core proxy signal and reverse – primary and secondary signal formation processes, room 1.15/16 on Tuesday, 24 May 2022, 13:56 CEST

EGU22-4226
Optimization of ’cold’ laser ablation sampling for water isotopic analysis on ice cores
by Eirini Malegiannaki, Vasileios Gkinis, Carlo Barbante, and Dorthe Dahl-Jensen 

CR3.1 – Modelling and measuring snow processes across scales, room 1.15/16 on Tuesday, 24 May 2022, 15:28 CEST:

EGU22-9092
Investigating the influence of local insolation on near-surface snow grain properties to constrain the mechanisms of pore close-off and associated elemental fractionation in polar firn
by Romilly Harris Stuart et al.

CL1.2.5 – The state-of-the-art in ice coring sciences, Room 0.14 on Thursday 26th of May 2022, 14:12 CEST

EGU22-5519
Estimating the diffusion in the deepest section of the Dome-C ice core using a new statistical method
by Fyntan Shaw, Thomas Laepple, Torben Kunz, Vasileios Gkinis, and Dorthe Dahl-Jensen

DEEPICE 1st annual meeting and Mid Term Meeting: 17-18 March 2022

DEEPICE 1st annual meeting and Mid Term Meeting: 17-18 March 2022

DEEPICE 1st annual meeting and Mid-Term Meeting will take place in Copenhengan and online, on the 17th and 18th of March 2022.

DEEPICE PhD students, together with other early stage researchers, will also participate to the Ice Core Analysis Techniques (ICAT) PhD School, in Copenhagen, as well as a one-week training school on snow sciences with many field activities, in Finse (Norway). This will be the first of the three DEEPICE training schools. 

One PhD position in structural glaciology at AWI available within DEEPICE project

One PhD position in structural glaciology at AWI available within DEEPICE project

ESR 7 PhD position is reopened for recruitment.

The Alfred Wegener Institute is looking for a PhD student to work on Microstructure and Air Inclusions in polar ice and to take part to the Innovative Training Network DEEPICE.

Applications are now open until the 15th of February 2022.

Apply on AWI website here.

More information about ESR 7 PhD project here.

Call for application: DEEPICE Winter school on snow sciences – March 2022, 20-26, Finse (Norway)

Call for application: DEEPICE Winter school on snow sciences – March 2022, 20-26, Finse (Norway)

12 November 2021

In the framework of the DEEPICE project, a winter school on snow-process sciences will be organized in Finse (Norway) in March 2022 (20-26).

The school will focus on snow-process sciences with theoretical and practical courses and exercises. It is aimed at PhD students who are involved in ice core climate record interpretation (and therefore will come after ICAT training school).

6 places are available for external students. Applications are now open until the 12th of December 2021.

In order to apply, please visit the dedicated page.

A new European network of young researchers to unveil past climate changes in Antarctica

A new European network of young researchers to unveil past climate changes in Antarctica

11 October 2021

A network of international researchers launches a European collaboration on October 14th 2021. This collaboration will train a new generation of scientists to understand how past climate changes impacted Antarctica

The new European innovative research and training network “DEEPICE” aims to equip the next generation of scientists with a solid background in ice core-related climate science, with a particular focus on Antarctica. This project will also tackle major technological and scientific challenges in order to optimally exploit the Beyond EPICA – Oldest Ice Core that will be extracted by a large European team in Antarctica in the coming years, to recover up to 1. 5 million years. Ultimately, these initiatives will answer key questions about large climate shifts that Earth faced in the past, and their impacts on the Antarctic ice sheet.

Climate changes in Antarctica may have important consequences for our society, as these may impact future global sea level due to the large volume of fresh water stored in the ice sheet. Hence, on the eve of the next Conference of the Parties (COP26), understanding climate changes and the vulnerability of the Antarctic ice sheet is a priority issue more than it ever has been before. As younger generations will inherit a planet that will look much different to today, they need to receive appropriate information to help them take actions in confronting one of the largest environmental crisis humanity is facing. Not only will DEEPICE prepare a network of young climate scientists, but it will also give them the much-needed skills to efficiently communicate the issue of climate change with the general public.

Through the PhD projects of 15 fellows, the new program will prepare the tools for optimal use of the very old ice core, developing cutting-edge instrumental techniques, state-of-the-art statistical tools for signal reconstruction and coupled climate models. These outputs will directly contribute to better understanding past processes in the climate system and, thus, improving prognoses for the future. This European network will also offer unique links with many non-academic partners that will provide these young scientists with the extended skill-set now required for pursuing academic and non-academic careers.

 Climate change is a major challenge for society today. New generations must be given the best tools to meet this challenge.

Dr Amaëlle Landais

Research director at the Laboratory for Sciences of Climate and Environment (LSCE) and the lead coordinator of the DEEPICE network, CNRS

The study of past climate is key to understanding the way our climate system works and how it might change in the future.

Dr Emilie Capron

Research scientist at the Institute of Environmental Geosciences (IGE) and the co-coordinator of DEEPICE, CNRS

The quest for Oldest Ice is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic challenges in the field of climate sciences. To tackle it, we need the best young talented scientists.

Prof. Carlo Barbante

Leader of the BE-OI project, University of Venice

A new Antarctic deep ice core will be drilled at the Little Dome C site in the coming years and optimal tools will be developed in the quest to unlock the climate and environmental secrets of the oldest ice (Credits: BAS).